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Other Radiology articles from the Musculoskeletal Imaging section Musculoskeletal Imaging

Polyethylene Liner Dissociation after Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Dislocation: a Case Series by Jordan W Paynter et al.

Published: 2020 Aug
Issue: 14(8) :: Pages: 14-23


Free full text article: Polyethylene Liner Dissociation after Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Dislocation: a Case Series

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Abstract: Reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a common procedure. While dislocation is a common complication, there are few reports documenting dislocation with associated polyethylene liner dissociation from the humeral tray. There have been 4 instances of this occurrence over 9 years at our institution, and there are specific radiographic clues for diagnosis. Recognizing polyethylene liner dissociation on imaging is important prior to treatment. In a "routine" dislocation, closed reduction may be attempted but when the polyethylene is dissociated, open reduction is the only treatment option, as closed reduction can damage the components. Dislocations with polyethylene dissociation may not be initially recognized, prompting a non-operative period leading to wear and metallosis. These 4 cases demonstrate key findings present on imaging to recognize the difference between a dislocation with and without polyethylene liner dissociation, namely the subluxation appearance rather than dislocation.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Clinical image, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Pediatric Radiology section Pediatric Radiology

Intervertebral Disc Calcification and Klippel-Feil Syndrome by Justin Cole et al.

Published: 2020 Aug
Issue: 14(8) :: Pages: 8-13


Free full text article: Intervertebral Disc Calcification and  Klippel-Feil Syndrome

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Abstract: Intervertebral disc calcification is rare in the pediatric population and is associated with sudden neurological manifestations. Although commonly symptomatic, conservative management yields excellent prognosis in the vast majority of cases. The following case illustrates the finding of intervertebral disc calcification in a patient with vertebral body segmentation anomaly consistent with Klippel-Feil Syndrome. As both entities are associated with potential neurological sequelae, this case of coexistent pathologies highlights the importance of recognizing the potential presence of intervertebral disc calcifications in pediatric Klippel-Feil Syndrome patients.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Computed Tomography, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Spontaneous Unilateral Intrasphenoidal Meningocele by Roger Rozzi et al.

Published: 2020 Aug
Issue: 14(8) :: Pages: 1-7


Free full text article: Spontaneous Unilateral Intrasphenoidal Meningocele

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Abstract: The sphenoid sinus is an uncommon location for protrusion of a meningocele. When this does occur, it nearly always presents with leakage of cerebrospinal fluid through the nasal cavity. We present a case of a 38-year-old female found to have a meningocele protruding into the left sphenoid sinus, who presented with intractable headache but no CSF rhinorrhea. The lesion was discovered on computed tomography angiography, which was performed in order to rule out intracranial pathology as the etiology of her headache. Prior imaging, including pre- and post-contrast MRI, demonstrated the fluid within the sphenoid sinus, but did not reveal the communication through a defect in the base of the skull. Thus, it was assumed to be strictly related to sinus disease in the past. Our case represents a phenomenon whereby meningoceles protruding through the basilar skull into the sphenoid sinus or any other location are potentially misdiagnosed due to poor visualization of the osseous defect and lack of awareness of this entity.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, Table





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