Search for articles: by Title or Body region


Surprise me!

Let us surprise you with an interesting article
Let us surprise you with an interesting article




Browse by Modalities





Browse by Journal Sections
Read more Radiology articles from this section
General Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Neuroradiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Thoracic Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Cardiac Imaging
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Breast Imaging
Read more Radiology articles from this section
OB/GYN
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Gastrointestinal Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Genitourinary Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Musculoskeletal Imaging
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Interventional Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Pediatric Radiology
Read more Radiology articles from this section
Nuclear Medicine





Browse by Journal Issues

2018
: Issue 12 (1) :: Issue 12 (2) :: Issue 12 (3) :: Issue 12 (4) :: Issue 12 (5) :: Issue 12 (6) :
: Issue 12 (7) :: Issue 12 (8) :
2017
: Issue 11 (1) :: Issue 11 (2) :: Issue 11 (3) :: Issue 11 (4) :: Issue 11 (5) :: Issue 11 (6) :
: Issue 11 (7) :: Issue 11 (8) :: Issue 11 (9) :: Issue 11 (10) :: Issue 11 (11) :: Issue 11 (12) :
2016
: Issue 10 (1) :: Issue 10 (2) :: Issue 10 (3) :: Issue 10 (4) :: Issue 10 (5) :: Issue 10 (6) :
: Issue 10 (7) :: Issue 10 (8) :: Issue 10 (9) :: Issue 10 (10) :: Issue 10 (11) :: Issue 10 (12) :
2015
: Issue 9 (1) :: Issue 9 (2) :: Issue 9 (3) :: Issue 9 (4) :: Issue 9 (5) :: Issue 9 (6) :
: Issue 9 (7) :: Issue 9 (8) :: Issue 9 (9) :: Issue 9 (10) :: Issue 9 (11) :: Issue 9 (12) :
2014
: Issue 8 (1) :: Issue 8 (2) :: Issue 8 (3) :: Issue 8 (4) :: Issue 8 (5) :: Issue 8 (6) :
: Issue 8 (7) :: Issue 8 (8) :: Issue 8 (9) :: Issue 8 (10) :: Issue 8 (11) :: Issue 8 (12) :
2013
: Issue 7 (1) :: Issue 7 (2) :: Issue 7 (3) :: Issue 7 (4) :: Issue 7 (5) :: Issue 7 (6) :
: Issue 7 (7) :: Issue 7 (8) :: Issue 7 (9) :: Issue 7 (10) :: Issue 7 (11) :: Issue 7 (12) :
2012
: Issue 6 (1) :: Issue 6 (2) :: Issue 6 (3) :: Issue 6 (4) :: Issue 6 (5) :: Issue 6 (6) :
: Issue 6 (7) :: Issue 6 (8) :: Issue 6 (9) :: Issue 6 (10) :: Issue 6 (11) :: Issue 6 (12) :
2011
: Issue 5 (1) :: Issue 5 (2) :: Issue 5 (3) :: Issue 5 (4) :: Issue 5 (5) :: Issue 5 (6) :
: Issue 5 (7) :: Issue 5 (8) :: Issue 5 (9) :: Issue 5 (10) :: Issue 5 (11) :: Issue 5 (12) :
2010
: Issue 4 (1) :: Issue 4 (2) :: Issue 4 (3) :: Issue 4 (4) :: Issue 4 (5) :: Issue 4 (6) :
: Issue 4 (7) :: Issue 4 (8) :: Issue 4 (9) :: Issue 4 (10) :: Issue 4 (11) :: Issue 4 (12) :
2009
: Issue 3 (1) :: Issue 3 (2) :: Issue 3 (3) :: Issue 3 (4) :: Issue 3 (5) :: Issue 3 (6) :
: Issue 3 (7) :: Issue 3 (8) :: Issue 3 (9) :: Issue 3 (10) :: Issue 3 (11) :: Issue 3 (12) :
 

September 2017 Issue

 




Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Crossed Aphasia in a Patient with Anaplastic Astrocytoma of the Non-Dominant Hemisphere by Stephanie Prater et al.

Published: 2017 Sep
Issue: 11(9) :: Pages: 1-9


Free full text article: Crossed Aphasia in a Patient with Anaplastic Astrocytoma of the Non-Dominant Hemisphere

Fulltext article    PDF fulltext

Abstract: Aphasia describes a spectrum of speech impairments due to damage in the language centers of the brain. Insult to the inferior frontal gyrus of the dominant cerebral hemisphere results in Broca`s aphasia - the inability to produce fluent speech. The left cerebral hemisphere has historically been considered the dominant side, a characteristic long presumed to be related to a person`s "handedness". However, recent studies utilizing fMRI have shown that right hemispheric dominance occurs more frequently than previously proposed and despite a person`s handedness. Here we present a case of a right-handed patient with Broca`s aphasia caused by a right-sided brain tumor. This is significant not only because the occurrence of aphasia in right-handed-individuals with right hemispheric brain damage (so-called "crossed aphasia") is unusual but also because such findings support dissociation between hemispheric linguistic dominance and handedness.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Thoracic Radiology section Thoracic Radiology

The Radiologic and Pathologic Diagnosis of Biphasic Pulmonary Blastoma by Fadi Nemeh et al.

Published: 2017 Sep
Issue: 11(9) :: Pages: 10-21


Free full text article: The Radiologic and Pathologic Diagnosis of Biphasic Pulmonary Blastoma

Fulltext article    PDF fulltext

Abstract: Pulmonary blastomas are rare malignancies, representing 0.25% to 0.5% of all primary lung neoplasms with often aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Clinical management of pulmonary blastomas depends on histologic subtype, staging, and presentation, and may consist of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Biphasic pulmonary blastoma is a subtype of pulmonary blastoma that exhibits biphasic histology, with both epithelial and mesenchymal malignant elements. We report a case of biphasic pulmonary blastoma in a 33-year-old female with 1 pack per day history of smoking for approximately 16 years, who presented with left-sided pleuritic chest pain on deep inspiration without otherwise significant pat medical history. Imaging evaluation using chest radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging identified a heterogenous, well-circumscribed, left lower lobe mass with extensive necrosis and hemorrhage. No lymphadenopathy or distant metastasis was detected through imaging evaluation. Surgical resection of the tumor followed by histopathological analysis confirmed a biphasic pulmonary blastoma.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Nuclear Medicine, Macroscopic pathology, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Breast Imaging section Breast Imaging

Large Subpectoral Lipoma on Screening Mammography by Andres Su et al.

Published: 2017 Sep
Issue: 11(9) :: Pages: 22-27


Free full text article: Large Subpectoral Lipoma on Screening Mammography

Fulltext article    PDF fulltext

Abstract: A 61 year-old woman presenting for bilateral screening mammogram was found to have an oval fat-density mass in the posterior right breast, partially visualized, with anterior displacement and thinning of the pectoralis major muscle. This mass was found on CT and MRI correlation to represent a large fat-containing mass, likely a lipoma, deep to the pectoralis major. On subsequent screening mammograms, the visualized portion of the mass remained stable. Subpectoral lipomas and intramuscular lipomas within the pectoralis major are rare, and their appearance on mammography may not be familiar to most radiologists. A review of the literature and a discussion of their appearance on multiple imaging modalities is provided.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Pediatric Radiology section Pediatric Radiology

The Missing Link: A Case of Absent Pituitary Infundibulum and Ectopic Neurohypophysis in a Pediatric Patient with Heterotaxy Syndrome by Adil Omer et al.

Published: 2017 Sep
Issue: 11(9) :: Pages: 28-34


Free full text article: The Missing Link: A Case of Absent Pituitary Infundibulum and Ectopic Neurohypophysis in a Pediatric Patient with Heterotaxy Syndrome

Fulltext article    PDF fulltext

Abstract: We report a case of absent pituitary infundibulum and ectopic neurohypophysis in a 4-year-old patient presenting clinically with hypopituitarism as well as heterotaxy syndrome complicated by global developmental delay and growth retardation. The clinical and laboratory workup of our patient suggested underlying hypopituitarism related to either congenital or acquired pathology, necessitating MRI to distinguish between them. We explain the various structural causes of hypopituitarism and detail how to predict the MRI findings and treatment, based on a fundamental understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology of the hypothalamic pituitary axis and distinguishing anterior versus posterior pituitary hormone derangements. We also discuss two important theories widely acknowledged in the literature to explain congenital hypopituitarism: 1. Head trauma typically during birth resulting in a stretch injury to the infundibulum. 2. Congenital fetal maldevelopment of midline structures.


Available image modalities: (click on modality to browse for other articles)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Graph, Table





© Journal of Radiology Case Reports - The Interactive Radiology Journal
Affiliated journal of Radiolopolis - The International Radiology Community