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May 2017 Issue

 




Other Radiology articles from the Genitourinary Radiology section Genitourinary Radiology

Oncocytoma: A Differential Consideration for an Incidentally Detected FDG-Avid Renal Mass on PET/CT by Christopher J Smith et al.

Published: 2017 May
Issue: 11(5) :: Pages: 27-33


Free full text article: Oncocytoma: A Differential Consideration for an Incidentally Detected FDG-Avid Renal Mass on PET/CT

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Abstract: Renal oncocytoma is a benign renal neoplasm that is often discovered incidentally and closely mimics renal cell carcinoma on common imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to the inability to reliably distinguish between these benign and malignant lesions with imaging, both are typically treated as if they are malignant. Hypermetabolic activity of renal oncocytomas is not frequently encountered because positron emission tomography (PET) is not a standard modality for imaging primary renal tumors. We present a case of a 65 year-old female with a history of thyroid cancer who had an incidentally discovered hypermetabolic renal mass on surveillance PET-CT imaging. Due to the concern for a primary renal malignancy or metastatic disease, the mass was resected and proven to be an oncocytoma on pathologic review.


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Nuclear Medicine, Computed Tomography, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Pediatric Radiology section Pediatric Radiology

Hamartoma of the spleen (splenoma) with calcifications in a child with beta-thalassemia: A case report by Dario Giambelluca et al.

Published: 2017 May
Issue: 11(5) :: Pages: 7-12


Free full text article: Hamartoma of the spleen (splenoma) with calcifications in a child with beta-thalassemia:  A case report

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Abstract: Splenic hamartoma (or splenoma) is a rare, benign, vascular tumor, often incidentally found at imaging, surgery or autopsy. Albeit usually asymptomatic and rare in children, when it occurs in the pediatric population it is more commonly symptomatic. We report a case of a 15-year-old girl with iron-deficiency anemia and beta-thalassemia, who had a large (10 x 8 x 7 cm) splenic lesion with calcifications, incidentally found during follow-up for splenomegaly and histologically characterized as hamartoma with calcified areas. The association of hamartoma and hematological disorders is a very unusual condition in children.


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Computed Tomography, Macroscopic pathology, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Sporadic Hemangioblastoma Arising from the Infundibulum by Michael N Pakdaman et al.

Published: 2017 May
Issue: 11(5) :: Pages: 1-6


Free full text article: Sporadic Hemangioblastoma  Arising from the Infundibulum

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Abstract: Hemangioblastomas are rare vascular tumors most often found in the posterior fossa and cervical spinal cord and commonly associated with von Hippel-Lindau Disease. We report a case of sporadic hemangioblastoma in a patient without von Hippel-Lindau Disease. Imaging characteristics included a solid, suprasellar mass that was homogeneously enhancing. These findings most resembled a pituicytoma or choroid glioma because of the close association with the infundibulum and the homogeneous avid enhancement. Microscopically, the neoplasm was seen to be composed of vascular channels associated with foamy stromal cells, containing clear cytoplasmic vacuoles. Microscopic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with hemangioblastoma. Hemangioblastomas are a rare form of vascular tumor most commonly associated with von-Hippel Lindau disease. Our finding of non-cystic hemangioblastoma arising from the infundibulum demonstrates that, while rare, hemangioblastomas should be considered on the differential diagnosis for an avidly enhancing suprasellar mass.


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Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Musculoskeletal Imaging section Musculoskeletal Imaging

Correction of Grade 2 Spondylolisthesis Following a Non-Surgical Structural Spinal Rehabilitation Protocol Using Lumbar Traction: A Case Study and Selective Review of Literature by Curtis Fedorchuk et al.

Published: 2017 May
Issue: 11(5) :: Pages: 13-26


Free full text article: Correction of Grade 2 Spondylolisthesis Following a Non-Surgical Structural Spinal Rehabilitation Protocol Using Lumbar Traction: A Case Study and Selective Review of Literature

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Abstract: Objective: Discuss the use of non-surgical spinal rehabilitation protocol in the case of a 69-year-old female with a grade 2 spondylolisthesis. A selective literature review and discussion are provided. Clinical Features: A 69-year-old female presented with moderate low back pain (7/10 pain) and severe leg cramping (7/10 pain). Initial lateral lumbar x-ray revealed a grade 2 spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 measuring 13.3 mm. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient completed 60 sessions of Mirror Image® spinal exercises, adjustments, and traction over 45 weeks. Post-treatment lateral lumbar x-ray showed a decrease in translation of L4-L5 from 13.3 mm to 2.4 mm, within normal limits. Conclusions: This case provides the first documented evidence of a non-surgical or chiropractic treatment, specifically Chiropractic BioPhysics®, protocols of lumbar spondylolisthesis where spinal alignment was corrected. Additional research is needed to investigate the clinical implications and treatment methods.


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Conventional Radiography, Table





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