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Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Cadaveric position of unilateral vocal cord: a case of cricoid fracture with ipsilateral arytenoid dislocation by Nirmalkumar Gopalakrishnan et al.

Published: 2012 Mar
Issue: 6(3) :: Pages: 24-31


Free full text article: Cadaveric position of unilateral vocal cord: a case of cricoid fracture with ipsilateral arytenoid dislocation

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Abstract: We report a case of cricoid cartilage fracture with unilateral arytenoid dislocation following a motorcycle accident. This 25 year old male sustained blunt injury to the head, face and neck. He presented late to the hospital with one week history of dysphonia. Laryngoscopy revealed cadaveric position of the non-functioning left vocal cord. CT and MRI showed laterally displaced left vocal cord. Displaced fractures were noted in the cricoid at the junction of lamina with the anterior arch on the left side and at the right side of the anterior arch, along with dislocated left arytenoid resulting in ipsilateral vocal cord palsy. Medialization thyroplasty was performed to improve his phonation. Laryngeal trauma warrants close monitoring because of the risk of airway compromise. Radiologists play a crucial role in early diagnosis and should always have high index of suspicion. Recognition of laryngeal injury is important for initial resuscitation as well as for long term airway and vocal function.


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Clinical image, Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Nuclear Medicine / Molecular Imaging section Nuclear Medicine / Molecular Imaging

F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m Sulfur Colloid SPECT imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of a case of dual solitary fibrous tumors of the retroperitoneum and pancreas by Javad Azadi et al.

Published: 2012 Mar
Issue: 6(3) :: Pages: 32-37


Free full text article: F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m Sulfur Colloid SPECT imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of a case of dual solitary fibrous tumors of the retroperitoneum and pancreas

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Abstract: Although FDG PET is increasingly used for the staging of many types of sarcoma, little has been written regarding the FDG PET imaging characteristics of solitary fibrous tumor. We report a patient undergoing FDG PET/CT surveillance for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue who was incidentally found to have two soft tissue masses in the retroperitoneum and pancreatic tail. Due to their low degree of FDG avidity, they were followed conservatively for approximately one year as they gradually increased in size. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid SPECT helped confirm that the pancreatic tail mass was not a splenule, after which both lesions were surgically resected and found to be extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors without malignant features. These findings suggest that, as with other low-grade sarcomas, benign extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors exhibit relatively little glycolytic metabolism in vivo.


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Nuclear Medicine, Microscopic pathology, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Breast Imaging section Breast Imaging

Breast Fibromatosis Response to Tamoxifen: Dynamic MRI Findings and Review of the Current Treatment Options by Michael J. Plaza et al.

Published: 2012 Mar
Issue: 6(3) :: Pages: 16-23


Free full text article: Breast Fibromatosis Response to Tamoxifen:  Dynamic MRI Findings and Review of the Current Treatment Options

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Abstract: Breast fibromatosis is a rare entity responsible for 0.2% of all solid breast tumors. It has been associated with scars, pregnancy, implants, and familial adenomatous polyposis. We present an interesting case of breast fibromatosis in a 29 year old woman which encroached upon her saline implant and subsequently filled its cavity once the implant was removed. The patient was put on tamoxifen therapy and at 14 month follow-up there was a significant decrease in the size of the mass. Dynamic MRI images are offered for review and current treatment options are discussed.


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Conventional Radiography, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Microscopic pathology, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the OB/GYN section OB/GYN

Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a rare presentation with pyocolpos by Deven Cox et al.

Published: 2012 Mar
Issue: 6(3) :: Pages: 9-15


Free full text article: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a rare presentation with pyocolpos

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Abstract: Obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA), also known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome, is a rare syndrome with only a few hundred reported cases described since 1922. Only a handful of these cases have been associated with pyocolpos. Mullerian duct anomalies have an incidence of 2-3%. While OHVIRA constitutes 0.16-10% of these Mullerian duct anomalies. Symptoms usually present shortly after menarche when hematocolpos develops during menstruation resulting in dysmenorrhea and a pelvic mass. The pelvic mass is the collection of blood products within the obstructed hemivagina. The first study in the diagnostic work-up is usually ultrasonography, which typically demonstrates a pelvic fluid collection which can simulate other disease processes thus confounding the diagnosis. MRI findings of the pelvis reveal a didelphic uterus. Imaging of the abdomen reveals agenesis of the ipsilateral kidney. MRI is beneficial in characterizing the didelphic uterus and vaginal septum for pre-operative planning. Understanding the imaging findings, in conjunction with the clinical presentation, is critical for early diagnosis in attempting to prevent complications such as endometriosis or adhesions from chronic infections with subsequent infertility.


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Graph, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Fluoroscopy, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Musculoskeletal Imaging section Musculoskeletal Imaging

NOMID: The radiographic and MRI features and review of literature by Faizah Mohd Zaki et al.

Published: 2012 Mar
Issue: 6(3) :: Pages: 1-8


Free full text article: NOMID: The radiographic and MRI features and review of literature

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Abstract: Neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) is a rare autoinflammatory disorder, which manifests early in infancy. We describe a case of a 10-year-old boy who has been unwell since infancy. He presented with urticarial rash, intermittent fever and hepatosplenomegaly followed by progressive arthropathy. His joint symptoms started at two years of age, which progressively involved multiple joints, resulting in bone and joint deformities. A series of joint radiographs demonstrated bizarre enlarging physeal mass with heterogenous calcification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the involved right ankle and knee showed characteristic thickened and calcified physeal lesions, which enhanced post-gadolinium. This debilitating disease is also known to involve the central nervous system and eyes. This case report aims to highlight the conventional radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this physeal abnormality in NOMID syndrome.


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Conventional Radiography, Clinical image, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Macroscopic pathology, Table

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