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November 2013 Issue

 




Other Radiology articles from the Gastrointestinal Radiology section Gastrointestinal Radiology

Traumatic Portacaval Shunt: A Case Report and Literature Review by Susanna C Spence et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 1-6


Free full text article: Traumatic Portacaval Shunt:  A Case Report and Literature Review

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Abstract: Computed tomography (CT) evaluation of the acute polytrauma patient has become well established as a mainstay of ER triage in hemodynamically stable patients. The radiologist plays a pivotal role in directing management by identifying and appropriately categorizing the severity of a patient`s injuries. High-grade liver injuries have undergone an increasing trend of nonoperative management over the last several decades, with concurrent decrease in mortality. However, we present a case of a patient with a grade V liver laceration, in whom a rare portacaval shunt was also present. In the setting of this rare injury, the radiologist will likely be the first person to recognize and categorize a severe complication, which may indicate the need for a fundamental change in patient management.


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Computed Tomography, Nuclear Medicine, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Gastrointestinal Radiology section Gastrointestinal Radiology

Isolated duodenal duplication cyst presenting as a complex solid and cystic mass in the upper abdomen by Salina D. Tsai et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 32-37


Free full text article: Isolated duodenal duplication cyst presenting as a complex solid and cystic mass in the upper abdomen

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Abstract: Duodenal duplication cysts are a rare subtype of gastrointestinal duplications cysts. Approximately 5% of gastrointestinal duplication cysts occur in the duodenum. An 18-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain and a subjective abdominal bulge. A computed tomography scan was subsequently performed and showed a solid and cystic mass with wall calcifications in the lesser sac of the upper abdomen. A duodenal duplication cyst was found unexpectedly on histopathologic analysis. This was also an unusual case as there was no evidence of malignancy. Four years after surgery, the patient remains asymptomatic. We present a brief literature review on duodenal duplication cysts and discuss its differential diagnosis.


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Computed Tomography, Microscopic pathology, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Breast Imaging section Breast Imaging

Contralateral Intramammary Silicone Lymphadenitis in a Patient with an Intact Standard Dual-Lumen Breast Implant in the Opposite Reconstructed Breast by Fernando Collado-Mesa et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 24-31


Free full text article: Contralateral Intramammary Silicone Lymphadenitis in a Patient with an Intact Standard Dual-Lumen Breast Implant in the Opposite Reconstructed Breast

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Abstract: Silicone lymphadenopathy is a recognized complication of silicone gel implant rupture; the ipsilateral axillary lymph nodes are most commonly involved. We report imaging findings on a range of different imaging modalities and biopsy results in a case of biopsy-proven silicone lymphadenitis involving contralateral intramammary and axillary lymph nodes in a patient with an intact standard dual-lumen breast implant in the opposite reconstructed breast. This case demonstrates that in a patient with disrupted lymph drainage due to prior mastectomy and axillary node dissection for breast cancer treatment, silicone particles can migrate in a retrograde fashion via the ipsilateral internal mammary lymph nodes and reach not only the contralateral axilla but also the outer quadrants of the contralateral breast, even in the presence of an intact breast implant.


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Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, Conventional Radiography, Ultrasound, Microscopic pathology, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor with Atypical Presentation: MRI and Diffusion Tensor Characteristics by Kalyan Paudel et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 7-14


Free full text article: Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor with Atypical Presentation: MRI and Diffusion Tensor Characteristics

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Abstract: We report the neuroimaging findings of a 26-year-old female patient with a biopsy-proven dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET). DNETs are an uncommon, usually benign, glial-neural cortical neoplasm of children and young adults who typically present with intractable seizures. DNETs may occur in any region of the supratentorial cortex, but have a predilection for the temporal lobes. Accurate neuroimaging diagnosis is essential since patients with DNET benefit from complete resection. However, accurate differentiation from other cortical lesions may be challenging. Typical conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) features can help in the differentiation from other similar cortical tumors. Diffusion tensor imaging can also provide important additional diagnostic information regarding the degree of involvement of adjacent parenchyma and white matter tracts. In this case, tractography and fractional anisotropy maps demonstrated that fiber tracts surrounding the lesion were displaced, but fiber integrity was maintained, which is more suggestive of a DNET rather than a more aggressive neoplasm. Accurate identification of DNETs is essential for the purpose of rendering a timely diagnosis and start appropriate treatment.


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Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Microscopic pathology, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Pediatric Radiology section Pediatric Radiology

Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency by Howard Tribe* et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 46-52


Free full text article: Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava associated with deep venous thrombosis and a partial Protein C deficiency

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Abstract: Dysgenesis of the inferior vena cava is rare but it is being increasingly diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging techniques. Patients are usually asymptomatic with abnormalities detected incidentally. An 11 year old boy presented with a 10 day history of fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, which progressed to his back and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging, computerised tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed the absence of a suprarenal inferior vena cava with bilateral superficial femoral vein thrombi extending cranially to the end of the aberrant inferior vena cava. Haematological testing revealed a partial Protein C deficiency. The presenting clinical picture in this case is unique within the English literature and highlights that deep venous thrombosis associated with inferior vena cava dysgenesis may not present with typical symptoms in children. Early use of advanced imaging modalities would expedite diagnosis and subsequent treatment.


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Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, Graph, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the OB/GYN section OB/GYN

Bilateral Subependymal Heterotopia, Ventriculomegaly and Cerebellar Asymmetry: Fetal MRI findings of a rare association of brain anomalies by Lucia Manganaro et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 38-45


Free full text article: Bilateral Subependymal Heterotopia, Ventriculomegaly and Cerebellar Asymmetry: Fetal MRI findings of a rare association of brain anomalies

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Abstract: Subependymal heterotopia (SEH) is a neuronal migration disorder characterized by nodules of gray matter along the lateral ventricular walls and often associated with other brain malformations. We present two cases of SEH associated with ventriculomegaly and cerebellar abnormalities diagnosed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 20 and 23 weeks` gestation respectively. Fetal MRI findings of this association of abnormalities have never been reported in literature. This report emphasizes the role of fetal MRI in recognition of subependymal heterotopia and other associated brain anomalies at early age of gestation along with its importance for a more targeted counseling and management strategies.


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Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Table

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Other Radiology articles from the Thoracic Radiology section Thoracic Radiology

Case report: Positron emission tomography fails to detect pulmonary adenocarcinoma recurrence after radiofrequency ablation by Cara Odenthal et al.

Published: 2013 Nov
Issue: 7(11) :: Pages: 15-23


Free full text article: Case report: Positron emission tomography fails to detect pulmonary adenocarcinoma recurrence after radiofrequency ablation

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Abstract: We describe the case of late recurrence of a focus of invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma (formerly mucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) following radiofrequency ablation, despite a negative positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan at 13 months following the ablation. A computed tomography scan performed at 24 months demonstrated unequivocal recurrence of the lesion. Combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography has been described as an adequate modality for the follow-up of thermally ablated pulmonary lesions. However, its utility in the follow-up of well-differentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma may be limited. Lesion activity may be underestimated by an inherently low metabolic activity. Small lesions may also be susceptible to partial volume effect. Long-term imaging follow-up of well-differentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma beyond two years after thermal ablation is prudent to avoid missing late recurrence.


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Computed Tomography, Nuclear Medicine, Table





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