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October 2015 Issue

 




Other Radiology articles from the Genitourinary Radiology section Genitourinary Radiology

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a transplanted kidney: A case report and literature review by Alyssa Lampe et al.

Published: 2015 Oct
Issue: 9(10) :: Pages: 26-34


Free full text article: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a transplanted kidney:  A case report and literature review

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Abstract: Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurs in approximately one percent of kidney transplant recipients. We evaluated a seventy-seven year-old man with a solid mass in his transplant kidney. On contrast enhanced ultrasound, the mass enhanced but remained persistently hypovascular throughout exam. The enhancement pattern of the mass differed from that typical of clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the main differential diagnosis. Final pathology after partial nephrectomy confirmed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This is the first report of contrast enhanced ultrasound findings in a renal mass diagnosed as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Contrast enhanced ultrasound has a promising role in imaging of renal masses, particularly relevant in transplant patients due to the lack of nephrotoxicity.


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Computed Tomography, Ultrasound, Microscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Musculoskeletal Imaging section Musculoskeletal Imaging

Evolution of gout: "malignant" change over time? by Sterling Ellis Eide et al.

Published: 2015 Oct
Issue: 9(10) :: Pages: 35-46


Free full text article: Evolution of gout:

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Abstract: Gout is a common entity; yet it is such a great mimicker in its imaging features that it can confuse clinicians and radiologists alike, sometimes leading to unnecessary investigations and treatment. We present a case of a 52 year old male renal transplant patient who presented with a slow growing mass in his left shin. The initial radiograph demonstrated a non-aggressive looking calcified lesion. A fine needle aspiration demonstrated this lesion to be gout deposition. The lesion was unchanged in the following eight years until the patient reported a sudden growth in size. Imaging showed features of an aggressive lesion with disruption of the previous calcification as well as enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical excision biopsy was performed in view of the worrisome features on imaging and the histology showed tophaceous gout. Following description of our case, we reviewed the clinical and imaging features of gout and discussed its differential diagnoses.


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Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Microscopic pathology, Clinical image, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Nuclear Medicine, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Interventional Radiology section Interventional Radiology

Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience by Jason Salsamendi et al.

Published: 2015 Oct
Issue: 9(10) :: Pages: 9-17


Free full text article: Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience

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Abstract: Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt–Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment.


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Angiography, Interventional, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Gastrointestinal Radiology section Gastrointestinal Radiology

Wandering spleen, gastric and pancreatic volvulus and right-sided descending and sigmoid colon by Enrique Flores-Ríos et al.

Published: 2015 Oct
Issue: 9(10) :: Pages: 18-25


Free full text article: Wandering spleen, gastric and pancreatic volvulus and right-sided descending and sigmoid colon

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Abstract: Wandering spleen is a rare condition, characterized by a mobile spleen that is attached only by an elongated vascular pedicle, allowing it to migrate to any part of the abdomen or pelvis. Mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus usually occurs in children and may be associated with wandering spleen. Both entities result from abnormal laxity or absence of the peritoneal attachments due to abnormal fusion of the peritoneal mesenteries. Pancreatic volvulus is a very rare anomaly, with only a few isolated case reports described in association with wandering spleen. Anomalous right sided descending and sigmoid colon is a very rare entity and its association with wandering spleen has not been previously reported. We report a case of wandering spleen associated with mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus, pancreatic volvulus and rightward shift of the splenic flexure of the colon and right sided descending and sigmoid colon in a young female.


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Conventional Radiography, Computed Tomography, Macroscopic pathology, Table





Other Radiology articles from the Neuroradiology section Neuroradiology

Metastatic pleomorphic adenoma to the supraspinatus muscle: a case report and review of a rare aggressive clinical entity by James G McGarry et al.

Published: 2015 Oct
Issue: 9(10) :: Pages: 1-8


Free full text article: Metastatic pleomorphic adenoma  to the supraspinatus muscle: a case report and review of a rare aggressive clinical entity

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Abstract: We report a case of a 65-year-old female with a recurrent right parotid pleomorphic adenoma (PA) 24 years after initial surgical excision. Positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an unusual suspicious FDG-avid erosive rim enhancing mass centered in the right supraspinatus muscle. Cytology from CT-guided aspiration of the mass was consistent with a histologically benign PA, and the patient was diagnosed with metastatic pleomorphic adenoma (MPA). The patient later developed diffuse pulmonary metastases and died within 3 months. MPA, although rare, is recognised as a potentially lethal malignant complication of recurrent or longstanding benign PA. As no biochemical or genetic parameters are predictive of malignant change, patients presenting with recurrent PA should be considered for screening for metastatic disease.


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Computed Tomography, Nuclear Medicine, Microscopic pathology, Table





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